War Nostalgia Is Leading Veterans to Places Like Syria. One Went Missing There. – The Daily Beast

War Nostalgia Is Leading Veterans to Places Like Syria. One Went Missing There. – The Daily Beast.

This is a very well written and eye opening article–j

There isn’t a day goes by i don’t wish to be back in the heat, wearing kit, and praying someone would give us a reason, or something would explode, somewhere, anywhere. I miss combat and combat zones i miss the freedom and the clear sense of purpose. As I check myself weekly back into why i don’t go anymore, it helps to know there are others who feel the same, and maybe we need a support group, or a chatroom or our own space in the VFW?  I miss it and i miss those friends, but today, reading about someone else and their desire to return, or having made it back, is enough.–j

Feed your mind the right things and your body will follow

Do you love yourself? Do you love your family and believe you are the best decision maker for them and not the government, state, city, school? Take minute and ask yourself, honestly, How in charge of your daily life and decisions are you? Do you allow the television to tell your children what they should wear, how they should act, what is socially acceptable, and most importantly what they should eat? How many times to you allow yourself to make poor diet decisions because there is a McDonalds every 100 yards, and its just easier, or you are to tired to cook?

Now I am not here to tell you how to live, but I can speak to what works for me. I’ve been through several very serious injuries in the past several years. PTSD, which debilitated me for almost a year,Torn bicep muscle, Broken back, and all at  one time in my right leg, a broken patellar punch defect with matching femoral head defect, partially torn medial collateral ligament tear, torn soleus muscle, and a concussion.

Physical activity decreases with injury, couple that with bad food choices and BAM! you are 25 lbs heavier almost over night.  What can you do to combat this? feed your mind. Ask yourself if all those freak post about Monsanto and home gardening are really wrong. What are the most productive food choices we can make that are good for us, chemical free, and fulfilling but most importantly healthy.

Yes I know the “Organic” label is expensive, do you have a porch and can get a hold of a couple of flower pots? can you add in a non chemically produced salad 3 times a week?

The video link below is very interesting, it is an ad, for which I have no ties to, but the cost info isn’t until the end. The historical documentation of how our food got to what it is today is worth the 20 minutes of your time as well as the illustrations.

Make your own decisions but know that if an animal won’t eat it, you probably shouldn’t either. Cavemen died from climate change, not paraben(chemical inmost all soaps, lotions and make up) based cancer and high-fructose corn syrup or processed sugar.

I eat no less than 2 8 oz probiotic (Kefir and Stonyfield organic Greek yogurt) servings a day, fruits and vegetables and go to the gym, we all get older and that can’t be changed but you set the bar for every day until the end. Don’t let your children lose to bad marketing, educate yourself, teach them to grow and enjoy tomatoes, cut out sodas, and enjoy this awesome planet we were given.  Oh!  a little secret, all the cool things are outside–j

http://keybiotics.com/video_toon.php

^very educational video on how our “food” got to where it is today

http://www.procapslabs.com/

^ 100% soluble, organic and solar produced vitamins.

My 4th floor balcony in Virginia, peppers(2 types), tomatoes, green beans and peas, I also grew potatoes in a separate container.

Hey!!! get back in your glass houses!!!

If you know me, you know I love me some crossfit, I’m not super good, or built like Rich Froning, but I love helping people get started and making my old fat butt complete the reps, rounds and movements.

We all have two choices in the gym; move weight, or move your mouth. I’ve lost 15 lbs, and my staff more than that, if you can do it, and you want to do it, DO IT!!

 Lee-Ann is a role model and a sledge hammer to every excuse your fat office mate has about why  they can’t go to the gym, or for a walk, or put down that 5th donut….

Should Pregnant Women Be Weightlifting?

By  | Healthy Living – 6 hours ago

Facebook/Lee-Ann EllisonExercise is essential for a healthy pregnancy, but one photo of a pregnant woman weightlifting has ignited a fiery debate on how much pregnant women should sweat. 

More on Yahoo Shine:Bodybuilding’s New Breed: Tanned, Toned, and Over 50 

Lea-Ann Ellison, 35, a stay-at-home mom in Los Angeles, is eight months pregnant with her third child and attends regular CrossFit classes at her local gym. Last week, Ellison emailed the company touting her success on the workout and included a photo of herself lifting weights. A few days later, the company posted the photo on its Facebook page, triggering an outcry on social media. Ellison received thousands of comments — many of which were negative — on CrossFit’s and her own Facebook pages, through several media outlets, and in email.

More on Yahoo: Exercise Is Not Likely to Be Your Ticket to the Weight-Loss Express

“This is why CrossFit is horrible. No one knows what they’re doing. This is a good way to lose your baby,” wrote Facebook user Evan Kennedy, a physical therapist. Andrea Hatfield wrote, “I do not find this impressive at all. No one would post a picture of themselves drinking a beer while eight months pregnant. Risky behavior while pregnant is no laughing matter.” And Amanda Strippel wrote, “Sorry lady, not safe. Baby first, sanity second.”

However, Ellison had her share of supporters. “I’m six months pregnant with triplets and am still Crossfitting as much as I can,” wrote Carol Metzger Bolliger. And Melissa McCarty wrote, “I’ve had four kids and pregnancy isn’t a handicap. It isn’t an excuse to ‘slow down’. You know your limits and obviously she’s doing exactly what her body allows. Great job mama!”

Lea-Ann/FacebookThe benefits of exercise during pregnancy are long proven: increased blood flow and energy, sounder sleep, and the release of endorphins (mood-boosting hormones). And one recent study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found that exercise reduces the risk of having a baby with a high birth weight and of having a cesarean section. However, many doctors point to pregnancy exertion as the cause of cervical problems and preterm labor, and public opinion is divided on whether women who continue to hit the gym during pregnancy are selfishly harming their unborn babies.

“I was really shocked by the reaction to my photos since I’ve always exercised during my two previous pregnancies and doctors have assured me that my routine is safe for both myself and my child,” Ellison tells Yahoo Shine. “However, the minute thephoto was posted online, I received an onslaught of comments from men and women telling me that pregnancy is no time to be tough and that I’m vain and selfish. It’s surprising that something I’ve always done — and consider normal — is shocking to so many people.”

Ellison’s routine of choice is CrossFit — an hourlong high-intensity exercise program that focuses on core strengthening and conditioning. It incorporates Olympic weight training, aerobic exercise, and gymnastics, using barbells, dumbbells, tire flipping, kettle bells and medicine balls. CrossFit is controversial — according to a story published in the Guardian, in addition to the already-strenuous training, the competition between participants (classes are small and intimate) lead many to overexert and collapse on the floor from exhaustion.

Despite the photo of Ellison that’s caused so much uproar, she says she doesn’t lift heavy weights. “I did lift weights for my maternity photo shoot but only 35 pounds,” she says. “The most I’ve lifted while pregnant is 65.” An avid exerciser, Ellison bought her first gym membership when she was only 16 years old. “I was really skinny and wanted some curves, so I started running and lifting at the gym,” she says. Soon, Ellison’s love of fitness snowballed and she began mountain biking, trail running, weight lifting and entering amateur fitness competitions. Two years ago, she discoveredCrossFit and never looked back.

Ellison begins each day by cooking breakfast for her son, 8, and daughter, 12. Once the kids are off to school, she eats half a cup of oatmeal with coconut oil and cinnamon, followed by a three-egg omelet with avocado and black beans and a protein shake, before heading off to CrossFit class.  Lunch usually consists of a grilled-steak salad or chicken with pasta, and dinner is another lean protein with vegetables and rice. She satisfies her rare sugar cravings with small amounts of dark chocolate.

“I used to take CrossFit classes five days a week, but lately, I’ve scaled back to three times,” says Ellison, who has gained a healthy 23 pounds of pregnancy weight. “What bothers me most about all this backlash is that there are so many pregnant women who eat poorly and don’t exercise at all during their pregnancies. There is an obesity epidemic in this country. What about that?”

According to Steve Goldstein, M.D., professor of urology and gynecology at New York University (he is not Ellison’s doctor), she seems to be on the right track as long as a medical professional is monitoring her routine. “If she’s resting when she’s tired, in general, I don’t see the harm,” Goldstein tells Yahoo Shine.

“However, the body goes through so many physiological changes during pregnancy which can alter balance and center of gravity, so it’s important to pay attention to your body,” he says. “Also, it’s not wise for women to take up an unfamiliar exercise routine. Pregnancy is a brand-new sport.”